Mercedes-Benz 300 Cabriolet D

In classic Mercedes-Benz tradition, the company’s top-of-the-range car is usually not a limousine but rather a large open car. Such was the case when the 300 saloon (W186) was announced at the Frankfurt Auto Show. It was the first Mercedes-Benz model intended for export and aimed squarely at the American market. Opposite the new saloon on the M-B stand was a magnificent and costly four-door open tourer called the Cabriolet D. Essentially identical to the saloon, the Cabriolet D featured a massive padded top with chrome landau irons along with a significant amount of body reinforcement, making it heavier than the saloon from which it was derived.

The car was intended for an exclusive clientele and was hand-built in limited numbers at the Sindelfingen body works beginning in March 1952, well after the start of saloon production. Production continued through June 1956, though it is said that individual cars continued to be built to special order at Sindelfingen until the following spring. Despite the limited production, even this was not exclusive enough for some of M-B’s clients, and Daimler-Benz was obliged to turn out special open “processional” vehicles for Heads of State and other potentates.

Power comes from a Type M186 OHC six-cylinder engine with an 85 mm bore by 88 mm stroke, 6.4:1 compression ratio, seven-bearing crankshaft, and twin Solex 40 PBJC dual downdraft carburetors. The motor produces 115 hp at 4,600 rpm and maximum torque of 114 lb/ft at 2,500 rpm while providing a top speed of about 96 mph.

This car was auctioned off by RM Auctions in August of 2010 at the Portola Hotel & Spa and Monterey Conference Center, Monterey, California.

115 hp, 2,966 cc inline OHC six-cylinder, four-speed all-synchromesh gearbox, independent front suspension with coil springs and anti-roll bar, swing axle rear suspension with coil springs and servo-operated auxiliary torsion bars, hydraulic telescopic shock absorbers, hydraulic drum brakes on all four wheels. Wheelbase: 120"

Source: RM Auctions
Photo Credit: Copyright Darin Schnabel

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