Hudson Commodore Six

Until 1948, most postwar cars were simply old prewar models dressed up with some additional trim. It did not matter, as car-hungry America bought everything Detroit could produce. Nonetheless, the race was on to develop new automobiles, and incredibly, small and independent Hudson managed to beat the “Big Three” to market with the first all-new automobile design.

The major innovation of the Hudson line was the “step-down” design. While traditional body-on-frame cars forced their passengers to climb up to enter them, Hudson designers placed the passenger compartment down inside the chassis, and a sturdy perimeter frame encircled the passenger compartment. As a result, Hudson passengers stepped down into the car, and the design provided a lower center of gravity and vastly improved handling. Unveiled to the public in December 1947, the new Hudson made a splash. So much so, that General Motors is reputed to have purchased a number of new Hudsons to scrutinize, and for several years, these cars were used as a standard of handling and performance at the GM Proving Grounds. Priced from $2,448, the new Hudsons represented an excellent value, and were available with six or eight-cylinder engines along three body styles, including a handsome convertible.

Est. 170bhp, 308 cu. in. inline six-cylinder engine with three-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension with coil springs, live rear axle with leaf springs, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 124"

Source: RM Auctions

Be part of something big