Ford Super Deluxe Convertible Coupe

Bigger really was better for Ford in 1941. The success of Mercury since 1939 clearly showed consumers’ desire for more interior room, and Ford responded with a number of changes in the 1941 models. The most significant change was an increase in the Ford’s wheelbase of two inches (to 114 inches), the first increase in wheelbase since 1933 and a change that was mirrored across town at Chevrolet.

Ford’s bodies were totally redesigned to make them wider to maximize interior space, and as a result, they almost completely enclosed the running boards under the bottoms of the doors. Headlights were located high up and far to the outside of the new wider front fenders, accentuating the new Fords’ larger, wider bodies and, not incidentally, providing much better road lighting.

The 1941 Fords were immediately recognizable not only by their wider, longer bodies but also by a dramatic new front end with the traditional vertical center grille now complemented by smaller oval grilles set low in the fender catwalks. Set back in the catwalks, the added grilles were formed of thin vertical bars recessed into unframed openings – a seductive, organic touch that added to their subtle appeal.

1941 was an important evolutionary year for Ford and was in many ways as significant as the debut of the V8 in 1932. No longer content to churn out incrementally evolutionary models and attempt to sell strictly on the basis of price and utility, the 1941 Fords were stylish, handsome and comfortable automobiles that offered value, comfort and style to a broad spectrum of the automobile market at the end of the Depression in Standard, Deluxe and Super Deluxe trim.

This car was auctioned off by RM Auctions in January of 2010 at the Arizona Biltmore Resort & Spa, Phoenix, Arizona.

90 hp, 221 cu. in. L-head V8 engine, three-speed manual transmission, live axle suspension with transverse leaf springs, four-wheel hydraulically-actuated drum brakes. Wheelbase: 114"

Source: RM Auctions

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