GMC Yukon Hybrid

From GM press: The GMC Yukon Hybrid broke ground with the world’s first production 2-Mode full hybrid propulsion system, which on the 2WD model offers 21 mpg in city driving – a 50-percent improvement over non-hybrid models. The lineup now includes the distinctive Yukon Denali Hybrid, which infuses a new level of luxury into the efficient utility vehicle.

Along with exceptional fuel economy, the Yukon Hybrid and Yukon Denali Hybrid deliver full-size capability – up to 6,200 pounds (2,812 kg) of towing capacity (2WD) and standard eight-passenger seating capacity.

Yukon Hybrid models are built on GM’s full-size SUV platform, which incorporates features such as a fully boxed frame, coil-over-shock front suspension, rack-and-pinion steering and a premium interior that bolsters the vehicle’s comfort, quality and capability. Wide front and rear tracks enhance handling and lower the center of gravity for a more confident road feel.

The Yukon Hybrid’s fuel-saving performance is derived from GM’s advanced Electrically Variable Transmission (EVT) and 300-volt nickel-metal hydride Energy Storage System (ESS), which work with the standard 6.0L V-8 gasoline engine with Active Fuel Management (AFM) and late intake valve closing (LIVC) technology. GM’s hybrid technology system not only enables the Yukon to launch and drive up to 27 mph (43 km/h) on electricity alone, it allows the Vortec 6.0L V-8 engine to operate in its more economical V-4 mode for longer periods.

As part of the vehicle’s emission control system, the ESS is warranted for eight years/100,000 miles.

In the Yukon Hybrid and Yukon Denali Hybrid, the hybrid system itself generates the electricity to propel the vehicle. When the brakes are applied or the vehicle is coasting, the electric motors in the hybrid system create electricity and store it in the 300-volt battery. This electricity helps move the vehicle.

The hybrid system provides seamless, dependable power on demand in an efficient package. In fact, its electric motor is less than half the size of those in single-mode hybrid systems. This technology was developed and is still used in fleets of hybrid transit buses in more than 70 North American and European cities. Scaled down for use in passenger vehicles, the two-mode system delivers fuel savings where it is needed most – in large vehicles with high levels of capability. The two-mode system was first introduced on the 2008 Yukon Hybrid. It is a core part of GM’s energy diversity efforts, centered on reducing dependence on petroleum, improving fuel economy, reducing emissions and minimizing the automobile’s impact on the environment.

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