Pontiac Grand Prix

The 2005 Grand Prix is made for those who enjoy driving, and precise handling is central to the vehicle's satisfying experience behind the wheel. With the wheels wider apart, Grand Prix corners flatter and more confidently. Also, less weight is transferred in the turns and tire loads are more evenly balanced.

At the heart of Grand Prix's handling is a four-wheel independent suspension featuring MacPherson struts wîth coil springs, lower A-arms and a 20-mm solid anti-roll bar in the front. Grand Prix's rear independent suspension features a tri-link coil-over-strut design and a 17.2-mm anti-roll bar on the GT and GTP. A 20-mm hollow anti-roll bar is used on the Comp G package. The result is a sportier ride wîth a solid, balanced feel. When it comes to stopping power, four-wheel disc brakes are standard on every model. ABS is standard on GT and GTP models; it is optional on Grand Prix models.

Grand Prix's new family of wheels for 2005 includes a trio of five-spoke, flangeless-design wheel covers and aluminum wheels. The flangeless design pushes the spokes of the wheel to the edge of the rim for a bolder, more prominent look. Sixteen-inch wheel covers are standard on Grand Prix models, and 16-inch aluminum wheels are standard on the GT. Seventeen-inch wheels are available on the GT and standard on the GTP.

Encouraging Grand Prix's corner-hugging personality are two versions of GM's venerable 3800 Series III V-6 engine. The naturally aspirated 3.8L V-6 powers Grand Prix and GT models, delivering 200 horsepower (145 kw) and 230 lb.-ft. of torque (305 Nm), while the top-of-the-line GTP is powered by a supercharged version of the 3.8L V-6. Equipped wîth a fifth-generation Eaton supercharger, which forces pressurized air into the engine to boost power, the GTP's engine delivers 260 horses (186 kw) and 280 lb.-ft. of torque (380 Nm).

Both engines employ electronic throttle control to provide no-lag engine response, and both are backed by the Hydra-Matic 4T65-E electronically controlled automatic transmission.

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