Ford Mustang Boss 429

With its new-for-1968 Torino and Cyclone fastbacks and 427 cubic-inch racing engines, Ford proved itself a more than worthy opponent to Chrysler on NASCAR ovals. However, Ford’s efforts were stymied by NASCAR’s earlier disapproval of the SOHC 427 racing engine, leaving the Tunnel-Port 427 to soldier on through 1968 while the all-new Boss 429 was readied for release in 1969.

To homologate the Boss 429 for NASCAR competition, it was offered as a limited-production option for the Mustang and not the Torino/Cyclone intermediates, with the conversion work performed by Kar Kraft in Brighton, Michigan. For the engineers, shoehorning the new Boss 429 V8 into the Mustang’s rather compact engine bay was no easy task, and major structural modifications were required to the shock towers and front suspension, which also resulted in a wider front track and a menacing stance.

Fewer than 900 Boss 429 Mustangs were created for 1969, followed by a smaller run of just 500 copies for 1970, prior to the cancellation of Ford’s corporate racing program. Although the Boss 429 was conservatively rated at 375 horsepower in street trim, it easily developed over 600 horsepower in racing tune, and today, it remains one of the most exotic racing engines conceived and produced by Ford during the “Total Performance” years.

This car was auctioned off by RM Auctions in August 2009 at the Portola Hotel & Spa and Monterey Conference Center, Monterey, California, in March of 2010 at the Ritz-Carlton, Amelia Island, Florida, in June of 2010 at the Town and Country Resort & Convention Center, San Diego, California, and in January of 2012 at the Arizona Biltmore Resort & Spa, Phoenix, Arizona.

375 bhp, 429 cu. in. overhead valve V8 engine with Holley four-barrel carburetor, four-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension with coil springs and upper and lower wishbones, live rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs, front disc and rear drum brakes. Wheelbase: 108".

Source: RM Auctions
Photo Credit: Copyright Darin Schnabel

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