Ford Mustang GT Convertible

The 2005 Mustang convertible was designed from the ground up to deliver a more rigid body structure without adding burdensome weight. This was accomplished by engineering it in tandem with the coupe. An added benefit of this process – one that helped meet a goal set for the convertible's exterior design – was that it provided the car with a cohesive, integrated look. It does not look like a coupe that has undergone reconstructive surgery to become a convertible.

The fabric top also seals better than did those of previous models and it affords superior rearward visibility. Looking for new and better ways to do things, Ford engineers designed a z-fold top that gives the Mustang convertible a finished appearance with the top down.

Aside from the top, the 2005 Mustang convertible shares the look of a legend with its coupe sibling. The signature long hood, short deck and classic design cues may be found on both. There's an unmistakable hint of Mustang notchbacks of yesteryear in the convertible's profile and stance – with the same athletic proportions, save for today's bigger, wider wheels and tires, that make it look as good at rest as it does at speed.

Just as it does with its exterior design and engineering, the 2005 Mustang convertible makes a statement with its interior.

Thanks to intelligent engineering that resulted in a convertible platform with more than twice the torsional stiffness of the previous version, this is the most quiet and solid drop top Mustang ever produced. The squeaks, shakes and rattles to which convertibles typically are prone are startlingly missing from the 2005 Mustang convertible.

Also improved is the rearward visibility. The 2005 Mustang convertible comes with a wide glass backlite (including a defroster), full quarter windows and slim C-pillars, all of which offer a driver a better look out the back.

Both passengers in the back and front will appreciate the lack of wind-related buffeting and noise when the top is down. With the windshield header more steeply raked than on the coupe and a modified rear seatback, the 2005 Mustang convertible has no need for add-on devices to block the wind.

Aside from these touches, the 2005 Mustang convertible shares the coupe's look of a much more expensive car. Mustang's past is honored by the twin-pod instrument panel and the present is addressed via modern materials and Ford's acclaimed attention to interior design and details. Plus, there's an optional color-configurable instrument panel, an industry first, that gives the driver more than 125 different color backgrounds to illuminate the gauges and controls.

Just as it does with its exterior design and engineering, the 2005 Mustang convertible makes a statement with its interior.

Thanks to intelligent engineering that resulted in a convertible platform with more than twice the torsional stiffness of the previous version, this is the most quiet and solid drop top Mustang ever produced. The squeaks, shakes and rattles to which convertibles typically are prone are startlingly missing from the 2005 Mustang convertible.

Also improved is the rearward visibility. The 2005 Mustang convertible comes with a wide glass backlite (including a defroster), full quarter windows and slim C-pillars, all of which offer a driver a better look out the back.

Both passengers in the back and front will appreciate the lack of wind-related buffeting and noise when the top is down. With the windshield header more steeply raked than on the coupe and a modified rear seatback, the 2005 Mustang convertible has no need for add-on devices to block the wind.

Aside from these touches, the 2005 Mustang convertible shares the coupe's look of a much more expensive car. Mustang's past is honored by the twin-pod instrument panel and the present is addressed via modern materials and Ford's acclaimed attention to interior design and details. Plus, there's an optional color-configurable instrument panel, an industry first, that gives the driver more than 125 different color backgrounds to illuminate the gauges and controls.

Like the 2005 Mustang coupe, the convertible uses a MacPherson strut front suspension and a rigid rear axle that has surprised the automotive press with its composure and handling prowess. The secret for its success is a three-link setup with a Panhard rod that maintains precise control over the axle.

Disc brakes are fitted at all four corners. The Mustang GT rotors are the biggest ever used on a mainstream Mustang and the calipers are the stiffest. A 4-channel anti-lock braking system (ABS) is standard on the GT convertible and optional on the V-6. ABS also comes with traction control. This all-speed system can be switched off when the driver desires to "hang it out" a bit on dry pavement, or when a smoky burnout is in order for an acceleration run.

Standard tires on the GT are W-rated P235/55ZR-17 all-season performance radials on 17-by 8-inch alloy wheels. The V-6 convertible comes with 16-by 7-inch wheels with T-rated P215/65R-16 all-season tires.

For those who want something more, the V-8-powered GT convertible boasts the same 300-horsepower, 4.6-liter V-8 as its coupe counterpart. The GT's new three-valve V-8 has variable cam timing and thus generates 40 more horsepower than the previous-generation Mustang GT V-8. Automotive historians also will note that this new 281-cubic-inch engine produces 50 percent more power with less displacement than the legendary small-block 289 V-8 of 1964.

And to help you keep a Mustang convertible in your stable, an optional active anti-theft package provides an increased level of protection, including a separate alarm sounder, new anti-tow sensor, ultrasonic interior motion sensor, perimeter anti-theft protection and even a high-capacity battery to keep sounding the alarm longer.

Source: Ford press