The Zimmer Quicksilver is Actually a Pontiac Fiero in Disguise

More often than not, the mid-engine Pontiac Fiero of the 1980s is not looked upon with great reverence. In fact, some have even called it one of the worst cars ever built.  Its reputation was tarnished by reliability issues, its choice of engines yielded underwhelming performance, and a rash of engine fires all but gave the Fiero an early demise; the two-door sportsters sold from 1984 to just 1988. Albeit once the butt of jokes, Pontiac Fieros are starting to become more and more collectible these days as youthful nostalgia takes hold of another generation, with well-kept models finding homes in many collections. This would appear to be one such well-kept model, but of a different name—the Zimmer Quicksilver.
The Zimmer Quicksilver is Actually a Pontiac Fiero in Disguise
Yes, it’s hard to believe there’s a little Pontiac Fiero beneath those retro-esque and gaudy lines, but well trust us… there is. Beginning in the late 1970s, manufacturing firm Zimmer Corp. began crafting “neoclassical” automobiles—modern cars dressed up in era-influenced designs—in response to a wave of consumer interest that came after the Excalibur SS (a Mercedes SSK lookalike based on the Ford Mustang) hit the market. Zimmer’s initial neoclassical car would be the fairly outrageous Golden Spirit. Fast forward to the mid-1980s however and the Zimmer Golden Spirit needed a stablemate. Using the pint-sized Pontiac Fiero as a base, Zimmer grafted on a larger nose section and elongated rear end, topped off with gobs of chrome and overall styling that aped the late ‘60s and early ‘70s. Look closely and perhaps there’s even a little Oldsmobile Toronado in its bulging front fenders.
The Zimmer Quicksilver is Actually a Pontiac Fiero in Disguise
Don’t mistake the long schnoz for a massive engine compartment though. The only thing you’ll find in there is a spare tire, luggage space, and perhaps a few Air Supply 8-track tapes. Remember, the Fiero is mid-engined, and the goliath coupe it spawned hides its 2.8-liter V6 behind the driver’s seats. In this case, it’s tied to a three-speed automatic transmission, which likely didn’t win over many Pontiac fans in its day either. Manual transmissions were also offered, but not so in the auto-only Zimmer. In the end, production of the Quicksilver ceased in 1988, coinciding with the final days of the Pontiac Fiero itself. Around 170 are claimed to have been built. RELATED: A "Tree Find" Pontiac GTO is Getting a Second Chance
The Zimmer Quicksilver is Actually a Pontiac Fiero in Disguise
This is one of them, and interestingly it’s up for sale on eBay. Inside and out, it’s apparent that this was a product of the ‘80s, but unlike many forlorn ‘80s era cars that have survived to see modern day, this Quicksilver appears to be rather remarkably well kept, as its just-over 25,000 miles would suggest. Need it in your life? You certainly won’t see too many others in the oncoming lane… RELATED: This Sleek Sports Car is Made of Cannabis

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