Grab This Gorgeous 1969 Ford Mustang Boss 302 Trans Am

Mustang vs Camaro is one of the most well known, if not the most well known, rivalry in the automotive community. Entire careers and fortunes have stemmed from it, and yet many people don't know that it originated out on the track, not on the street. Following Trans Am Championship titles claimed by the Camaro Z/28 in 1968 and 1969, Ford sought to reclaim the honor of being top dog in the SCCA series. Its first move was to enlist the talents of C2 and C3 Corvette designer Larry Shinoda, and its second was to give him total autonomy in designing Ford's perpetuated Z/28 fighter. The result of Shinoda's work was the 1969 Ford Mustang Boss 302, a race car through and through. No half measures, no excuses. RELATED: See More of the 1969 Ford Mustang Boss 302
Grab This Gorgeous 1969 Ford Mustang Boss 302 Trans Am
The Boss 302 saw a number of changes from its street counterpart, as well as its heftier older brother, the Boss 429. Shinoda's design removed the fake rear air-scoops, added a front spoiler, and rear deck wing—a detail that, yours truly, happens to really appreciate. Horizontal rear window shades and a blacked out hood were optional, and when the hood is opened on models equipped with the 4.30:1 rear axle ratio, a vertically mounted oil cooler might be visible in front of the radiator. That means the very rare, and highly sought after Drag Pack made it onto the Boss 302, even though it was never formally offered on the car. RELATED: The Long Lost Boss 302 Concept Has Finally Been Found
Grab This Gorgeous 1969 Ford Mustang Boss 302 Trans Am
Of course what makes an example like this one so desirable isn't just the classic Trans Am racing look, it's the performance capabilities that back it up. The Boss 302 power plant was a combination of the Ford Windsor 302 and the Ford Cleveland 351 cylinder heads. Rated at 290 horsepower back in the day, modern dyno tests have proven that figure to be very conservative with the deep breathing "G Code" V8 putting up figures in excess of 380 horsepower. The car you see here is one of six headed to auction from the Jim Click Ford Collection during Monterey Car Week 2016. Chassis number 9F0M148628 was a Shelby team car, and is linked racing greats like Dan Gurney, George Follmer, A.J. Foyt, and Pete Revson, whose name this car bears. It's expected to go somewhere between $1 million to $1.3 million when it crosses the RM Sotheby's auction block, but with the rabid nature of Mustang fans, and the background of this example, larger figures may be realized when it rolls onto the auction block in August. RELATED: 45 Years Later, The Mustang Boss 302 is Still the Boss

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