A Rolls-Royce Station Wagon Actually Exists

Over its long lifetime, Rolls-Royce, purveyor of some of the world’s most luxurious automobiles, has set a seriously high bar when it comes to car design, refinement, and class. And as a rule of thumb, if it isn’t regal or grandiose, it won’t have a Spirit of Ecstasy ornament at its nose.  Saloons, “drophead” coupes, and dictatorial limousines are all to be expected of classic Rolls-Royces. But a station wagon? Not so much. Even so, a few do exist and this is once such oddity, a 1983 Rolls-Royce Silver Spirit estate. The rare ‘Roller’ recently took to the auction block in Berlin, Germany, where it fetched €34,500 (about $38,714) for its wonderful, albeit head-scratching peculiarity. RELATED: See More of this 1983 Rolls-Royce Station Wagon
A Rolls-Royce Station Wagon Actually Exists
To say that Rolls-Royce built Silver Spirit station wagons would be a bit of a stretch. As history shows, many of the early luxury automakers (such as Rolls-Royce) relied upon separate coachbuilding firms to craft bespoke car bodies for discerning clients, mounted atop the standard running gear. In the early part of the 20th century the practice was widespread, though as the auto industry progressed, it soon moved to the fringes. This however is still a remarkable early 1980s example of how coachbuilding has survived, though the auction house didn’t note which firm rebodied the Silver Spirit from luxury saloon to opulent station wagon. What is provided is a rather unusual history of what the wagon was used for. According to the firm, this Silver Spirit was delivered new to a customer in the UK who used it as a support vehicle for their motorsport endeavors. Imagine it filled to the gills with tires, jack stands, spare parts, and motor oil. Not only that, it was used to pull a trailer as well… quite the unique tow rig. RELATED: Check Out the All-New 2016 Rolls-Royce Dawn
A Rolls-Royce Station Wagon Actually Exists
Other rather un-Rolls-Royce-like oddities include its roof rack, a spare tire in the boot, and according to Barnfinds, a conversion system to allow the massive 6.75-liter V8 to run on “LPG”, or liquified petroleum gas, such as propane or butane. One would surmise an engine that big can sure drink through fuel quite quickly. The Silver Spirit slaps through its gears courtesy of an aged three-speed automatic. As far as unusual cars go, it’s definitely out there, but whoever bought it is sure to be the only person in their neighborhood with one. RELATED: This Aston Martin has Been in a Barn Since 1986 Photo Credit: Auctionata

Be part of something big