Nissan Takes Connected Car App Offline After Vulnerability Exposed

The latest automaker to have issues with potential hacking vulnerability is Nissan. It centers around the companion app for their Leaf electric vehicles and is serious enough that they've taken the service offline. According to ArsTechnica, the app, which can do things like turn the climate control on and off, does not require any kind of authentication. All the app uses is the car's VIN. RELATED: Nissan Leaf Pickup Truck Both Demented and Awesome
Nissan Takes Connected Car App Offline After Vulnerability Exposed
Troy Hunt and Scott Helme pubilished these findings on Wednesday and Nissan took the app offline on Thursday. Hunt first started looking at NissanConnect after a workshop he ran in Norway this past January. One of the attendees realized that not only could he control his Leaf, but other people's too. This led to Helme and Hunt taking a closer look and eventual publication of the security flaw. RELATED: Senate Report Warns Modern Cars Susceptible to Hacking Nissan reacted quickly be taking the app offline, but it points out the problem with our very connected cars. Although this flaw only gave access to things like the temperature settings and telematics, there's no way of knowing when a flaw like this could let someone take control of your car. Bet that old jalopy with nothing but a cheap radio is looking pretty good right now.
Nissan Takes Connected Car App Offline After Vulnerability Exposed
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