CEO Promises Working Hyperloop by End of 2016

Why are people so interested in what is basically a new way of moving goods and people around? When it comes to Hyperloop, the reason people are so interested is because it is so different. The infrastructure project is still in development, but it looks like nothing else out there. And once operational, the way goods and people move around will look completely different too. Recently at CES 2016, Engadget sat down with the newly named CEO of Hyperloop Technologies, Rob Lloyd, who talked about the future of the product, well beyond the nitty-gritty. But he did offer that the first working Hyperloop could be ready by the end of this year. RELATED: Hyperloop Technologies Building Vegas-Area Test Facility
CEO Promises Working Hyperloop by End of 2016
We’ve been talking about this product a great deal, but it is worth breaking down just what it is again. Hyperloop takes a tube, creates low pressure area inside that pod, levitates that pod, and uses electricity to move it. Basically there is little to no friction, which means you can move large parcels of cargo with a fraction of the energy. In fact, Lloyd claims it has 60 percent of the cost and three times the speed of the current rail system, with a targeted top speed of 750 mph. RELATED: Elon Musk's Hyperloop Dream Becoming a Reality
CEO Promises Working Hyperloop by End of 2016
The ways this impacts the current transportation infrastructure is massive. If there were widespread Hyperloop lines, it could take congestion off the current rail system as well as the highway system, thus opening up the roads for passenger cars. Lloyd claims it will qualify for a lot of green capabilities, likely referring to green incentive credit swaps , green bonds. The lack of friction means you need less power to move. At one point, Engadget’s Senior Editor, Daniel Cooper asks, “Is it weird for people to be so excited about what is effectively an infrastructure project?” That kind of sums up the recent coverage. The answer, according to Lloyd, is that people want a bold vision of the future. The public is also now interested in how new companies take on the establishment. And just like Uber, people are interested in seeing how this new form of infrastructure can disrupt the status quo. RELATED: Five Ways Elon Musk's Falcon 9 Rocket Could Change Spaceflight

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