The URB-E is One Neat Little Electric Scooter

These days space can be hard to find, especially in big cities—space to live, space to park, space to store things, even momentary space on the subway or train. It’s a consideration for this shortage of space that spawns many a great invention, and the teensy URB-E electric scooter seems to be one such gizmo.  Designed in Pasadena, California, the URB-E is about as minimalist as electric scooters can get. It weighs just 35 pounds, folds into a highly compact and carry-able arrangement, and nets an electric riding range of around 20 miles. Better still, it starts at just $1,500, making it one of the more affordable options around. RELATED: The 2015 Trefecta DRT is the Supercar of e-Bikes
The URB-E is One Neat Little Electric Scooter
The source of the URB-E’s performance is a 250-watt brushless electric motor, which draws juice from a 36-volt lithium-ion battery pack. Contrary to typical two-wheelers, the electric motor powers the scooter’s front wheel (a cross-drilled disc brake provides stopping power at the rear). This recipe equates to a top speed of 15 mph and the aforementioned 20 miles of range. That relatively low top speed means you’ll likely be overtaken by swift bike riders, but on the plus side, you don’t need a motorcycle license to ride one. The URB-E qualifies as a “low-speed electric vehicle,” and it makes a lot of sense for urbanites looking to solve an extended walking commute to the train (the scooter folds and unfolds in seconds) or a short commute from home to work. Pothole fears? The electric scooter features a coil-sprung seat. RELATED: Here's the Perfect Scooter for the Mini Cooper Owner
The URB-E is One Neat Little Electric Scooter
It’s a bit of a fashion statement too. The front portion of the URB-E frame can accept a number of colorful sleeve inserts and options include a cup holder for your cup-o-joe, an LED headlight, and a cargo basket in the rear. Anyone want to take a spin? RELATED: Check Out the Stylish e-Bike that Ford Just Built

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