VW Admits 800,000 Diesel and Gas Vehicles Miss CO2 Standards

In September, Volkswagen revealed that over 11 million diesel vehicles globally contained “defeat devices,” which trick emissions testing software into providing lower-than-normal nitrous oxide readings.  On Tuesday, the VW Group has revealed a further 800,000 vehicles exhibit emissions “irregularities,” but this time in relation to carbon dioxide levels on both diesel and gasoline engines. As part of an ongoing internal review at Volkswagen, the company found that certain models exhibited higher carbon dioxide emissions—and inherently higher fuel consumption figures—than were originally certified. VW has yet to reveal which models are under investigation, and whether these overlap the previous “defeat device” vehicles, however the majority are said to be diesel engines. Volkswagen estimates a fix for the problem could total approximately €2 billion ($2.17 billion). RELATED: Bugatti Chiron Hypercar Said to be Unaffected by "Dieselgate"
VW Admits 800,000 Diesel and Gas Vehicles Miss CO2 Standards
In an included statement, Volkswagen CEO Matthias Müller noted that the admission of these subsequent engine investigations is “a painful process, but it is our only alternative.” He continued, “for us, the only thing that counts is the truth. That is the basis for the fundamental realignment that Volkswagen needs.” The carbon dioxide announcement came following a violation notice issued to the German automaker by the EPA on Monday, which alleges the company also installed defeat devices on its larger 3.0-liter diesel V6 engines. When tested with a new procedure designed to sidestep the devices, the EPA says these engines produced nitrous oxide levels up to nine times the EPA standard. RELATED: The Volkswagen "Dieselgate" Scandal is Getting a Movie
VW Admits 800,000 Diesel and Gas Vehicles Miss CO2 Standards
That notice alleges at least 10,000 vehicles in the U.S. are affected, which include V6 diesel versions of the 2014 VW Touareg, 2015 Porsche Cayenne, and 2016 Audi A6, A7, A8, and Q5. In a statement released following the notice, Volkswagen still maintains the V6 diesels do not contain defeat devices, however VW, Porsche, and Audi have issued a stop-sale on these vehicles in North America, as well as 2013 to 2015 models of the Q7. As noted previously, though the affected diesel vehicles do offend EPA regulations, the vehicles remain safe to drive. RELATED: Volkswagen May Cancel Nonessential Cars Like Golf R400

Be part of something big