Why It's Important to Get Back Onto a Motorcycle

Later this week, I’ll be heading into Los Angeles to pick up a Honda motorcycle. It will be the first time since my accident that I get back on two wheels. And honestly, I have some trepidation. When I wrecked out, it hurt. A lot. I broke my shoulder, bruised both my back and my lung, and got some gnarly scars (image of the aftermath below). Because of that, it would be very easy for me to throw the towel in and call it quits with my motorcycle pursuits. But that’s just not me, and it shouldn’t be you. Throughout my life, I’ve encountered obstacles that could have very well changed who I am today. I could have become intimidated, hiding away in some depressing cubicle, wasting away until I die of old age, or from pure and utter boredom. But I haven’t. I’ve taken risks, pushed on through life’s challenges, and looked my fear straight in the face. Except for spiders, I’ll definitely go into hiding from spiders. RELATED: Laying Down a Motorcycle Sucks, A Lot
Why It's Important to Get Back Onto a Motorcycle
For instance, another driver plowed into my driver side door at 55 miles per hour when I was just 16 years old. Did that scare me away from driving? Hell no, I was back driving with my arm in a cast just two weeks later. Additionally, while swimming in a lake, I almost took off my toe and put a 2-inch gash into my knee. If I had shied away though, I would have never fallen in love with my wife who, after falling into a lake, held onto a fishing pole, came back up and continued to fish for the next two hours. RELATED: Read Our Review of the Kawasaki Z1000
Why It's Important to Get Back Onto a Motorcycle
It’s easy to run scared, it’s much harder to get back up, pick up the pieces, and return to normal as if nothing ever happened. Of course, you should learn from your mistakes, but they should never control you. I know both my wife and my mother will be reading this and my upcoming articles just wishing I would stop. But again that’s not in my nature. It would be especially easy for me to stop riding motorcycles following the $8,000 medical bill we’re saddled with after getting an ambulance ride, and spending the night at the hospital. But I won’t stop, I won’t be persuaded to quit something I absolutely love doing just because one negative experience. Even if that negative experience really, really sucked. RELATED: Why a Good Helmet Matters
Why It's Important to Get Back Onto a Motorcycle
Riding motorcycles, getting back into a car, or even swimming in a lake, these are the times in your life where you come to a crossroads. You can turn left, or you can turn right. Both will affect how you live the rest of your life. Neither is exactly wrong, but neither is exactly right either. For me, and for many other riders out there, choosing to get back onto a motorcycle is an easy one. For others, it could take some time. Soon, I’ll be picking up motorcycles once again, seeing what these machines can really do. Part of me is ready for this, part of me is still wondering if I got brain damage when I hit the cliff wall for still wanting to ride. But if I don’t, if I run and hide, if I cocoon myself in the bubble my mother wants me to be in, I’ll be betraying my nature, I’ll be betraying everything I’ve achieved throughout my life. You could run in the face of uncertainty, but do you really want to be that person? I don’t. RELATED: The Huge Moto CBR Black Will Make You Absolutely Drool
Why It's Important to Get Back Onto a Motorcycle
So stay tuned. We’ve got a ton of motorcycle content coming your way very soon. Everything from gear reviews, to new and custom motorcycles, and including some epic road trips that are sure to make you itch to get out and ride. Until then, stay safe.

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