American Commuters Don’t Want to Share the Ride

There’s an odd trend going on in American driving habits. Sure, commuters still like driving their cars to work. Just don’t ask them to share the ride. That’s the findings of a new report from the U.S. Census Bureau. It says ride sharing has dropped 54 percent since 1980. It’s kind of like bowling, which is growing in popularity. Yet, nobody wants to bowl in a league any more. RELATED: Watch an RC Car Race through Traffic
American Commuters Don’t Want to Share the Ride
The Census Bureau doesn’t speculate why, but carpooling is most prevalent among Hispanics. Yet, even they are tiring of it. The census report says Hispanics showed the largest declines in carpooling between 2006 and 2013, from 18.6 percent to 14.7 percent. Not surprisingly, people who live in urban areas had the lowest percent of commuting by car at 78 percent. That’s compared to suburban commuters (89 percent) and non-metropolitan commuters (91 percent). The national average is 86 percent. RELATED: Weird Traffic Laws from Around the World
American Commuters Don’t Want to Share the Ride
Public transportation showed the largest increase among workers 25 to 29. It rose from 5.5 to 7.1 percent from 2006 to 2013. Probably because college debt made it impossible to even afford a car, let alone drive it to work. The metropolitan areas with the lowest percentage of car commuting workers are: greater New York City, 56.9%; Ithaca, NY, 68.7%; greater San Francisco, 69.8%; Boulder, CO, 71.9%; and Corvalis, OR, 72.6%. What makes us shudder most is the second most popular way to commute to work in Ithaca, NY isn’t even motorized. It’s walking. RELATED: Why Can’t I Go Fast? Speed Limits Explained Photos:  i-sustain.com; Photos of Los Angeles

Be part of something big