GM Brought its One Millionth Corvette Back from the Grave

In 1992 when the one millionth Corvette rolled off the GM production line, its place in Chevrolet history was securely established, though none could have expected how noteworthy it would become. On Feb. 12, 2014, it was one of eight celebrated Corvettes that plunged into a sinkhole within the National Corvette Museum.  It was extracted – battered and bruised – yet in all its hardship, it still manages to look stunningly gorgeous. And those appearances will only improve, as Chevrolet has begun the process of restoring it to original condition. RELATED: Take a Closer Look at the Sinkhole-Damaged 'One Millionth' Corvette
GM Brought its One Millionth Corvette Back from the Grave
The restoration process is being handled at the General Motors Design Center by members of GM’s own Mechanical Assembly group, who normally spend their time building prototypes and concept cars. Rather than construct an all-new car, GM says the workers will make every attempt to preserve its original appearance. It’s safe to say the ‘Vette is in good hands. In historic fashion, this 1992 convertible celebrated the one millionth Corvette production milestone by featuring the same color combinations as the very first production 1953 Corvette: white exterior, black convertible top, red interior. One other sinkhole-damaged Corvette – a 2009 ZR1 prototype nicknamed ‘Blue Devil’ – has already been restored, and the museum will soon oversee restoration of a damaged 1962 Corvette. RELATED: Check Out the Road-Legal 2016 Chevrolet Corvette C7.R Edition
GM Brought its One Millionth Corvette Back from the Grave
To purists, this highlights an interesting rub – should these cars even be restored at all? Despite all its damage, this ’92 is still an achingly gorgeous shape, if not – to some eyes – even prettier given its distinctive history. It tells a story that few classics ever will and stands apart from the throngs of pristine examples you'll find at car shows across the country. In an answer to those fans, GM and the National Corvette Museum have decided to leave five of the other Corvettes in their as-recovered state, set to become a part of a sinkhole-themed display at the museum. RELATED: If the 2017 Corvette ZR1 Gets Mid-Engined, It Could Look Like This ____________________________________ Click Here to Read the Original Article on BoldRide

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