‘The Windshield-Pitting Mystery of 1954’ Wasn’t Caused by Marine Animal Skeletons

Sometimes, the most mysterious mysteries are the mysteries you didn't even know were mysteries at all. Time for your daily history lesson. After NPR recently brought "The Windshield-Pitting Mystery of 1954" to light, BestRide.com took it a step further, pushed up their reading glasses, and dove deeper into what really could have caused the hundreds of windshield nicks in a group of communities in Washington state. To quickly summarize, a series of complaints started to pile up in Bellingham, Wash. regarding small dings in car windshields. This essentially created a sort of minor hysteria and paranoia about what was happening to all these cars. Originally assumed to be vandalism, the theories went so far as tiny animal skeleton remnants from H-bomb testing falling from the sky and damaging the glass. Seriously, people went there. RELATED: The Cadillac Le Mans: A Concept Car Shrouded in Mystery
‘The Windshield-Pitting Mystery of 1954’ Wasn’t Caused by Marine Animal Skeletons
In reality, all the wild theories were just speculation, and there's plenty of evidence that suggests what was really happening. BestRide explains how the types of glass on cars, the lack of pitting in other windows (like on houses), and the uptick in speed and length of driving all played into how this damage occurred. Photo credits: Museum of History & Industry, Seattle Post- Intelligencer Collection, 1986.5.571.1 ____________________________________ Click Here to Read the Original Article on BoldRide

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