Cord Trademark for Sale by Family of Classic 8/10 Builder

Glenn Pray was a visionary who, thanks to some financial backers, briefly restored the Cord name to prominence in the 1960s. Now his family hopes that legacy lives on by selling the trademarks to the vaunted nameplate. E.L. Cord formed the holding company that produced some of the most beautiful cars in the 1930s, including his Cords, as well as Duesenbergs and Auburns. He was forced into bankruptcy by the Great Depression. The brands largely dropped from the mainstream until Pray stepped in 25 years later. RELATED: See pictures of the 1930 Cord L-29 Cabriolet
Cord Trademark for Sale by Family of Classic 8/10 Builder
In the early 1960’s, Pray, from Broken Arrow, Oklahoma, acquired the Auburn-Cord-Duesenberg Company and relocated it back to his home. With the sale came the licensing and manufacturing rights of all three of these legendary marques, as well as literally, tons of new-old stock parts. Pray’s ambitions were not necessarily to strictly provide needed items to those who owned these beautiful vehicles, for he had a vision, to give new life to one of the most beautiful vehicles ever to come out of production, the “Coffin-Nose” CORD 810 and 812 series. RELATED: See photos of the 1936 Cord 810 Convertible Phaeton
Cord Trademark for Sale by Family of Classic 8/10 Builder
According to the announcement of the trademark sale, "When Pray’s CORD 8/10 was first unveiled in 1966, it was given nearly the same amount of praise in the media as the original car had 30 years earlier. Pray’s car was hailed as a masterpiece." (One was also bought by America's perennial teenager Dick Clark.) According to one history of the Cord, "With a Chevrolet Corvair power plant, and front wheel drive, the new version of the original 8/10 Cord features a convertible top, and a body composite called Royalex developed by U.S. Rubber Company (one of the investors in the Cord)." RELATED: See Photos of the 1937 Cord 812 Phaeton Well, just like the Depression sunk the original Cord, the depressing fire-prone Corvair engines extinguished any hope of this car becoming mainstream reality. Some later success was enjoyed when SAMCO acquired the manufacturing rights and produced models from 1968 to 1970. Pray so loved the Cord name he wouldn't part with it. Even after getting a million bucks in the 1970s for the Duesenberg nameplate and a half-million dollars for the Auburn name. Maybe now his family is hoping for some return on Pray's investment. Two trademarks are being sold. They will be offered during the Leake Collector Car Show & Auction in Dallas, on Nov. 22. RELATED: See the Second Front-Wheel Drive Cord

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