Got 60 Minutes? You Could Build this Wild OSVehicle

If you’re the slightest bit handy with a wrench, enjoy taking on projects of varying difficulty, and are looking for a new cheap car – log off craigslist and log onto OSVehicle’s website. You might never have to go to a dealership again. The conundrum is simple. Cars are fantastic movers of people and things, but they aren’t exactly what we’ll call cheap. OSVehicle is looking to bridge that cost gap by offering two initial open-source vehicles – that is, you contribute to and help design it yourself – for a fraction of what a conventional new car costs. The company is currently testing prototypes, and will begin retailing the knockdown kits once development is complete.
RELATED: See photos of the open-source  2010 EDAG Light Both cars are underpinned by a scalable rear-engine chassis, of which the first model is called the Tabby. It’s a small two-to-four person city-car that amazingly requires only one hour to assemble. OSVehicle offers the Tabby with either a traditional combustion engine, an electric motor, or a hybrid sports-electric engine (IHE). The latter layout combines a combustion engine with two electric motors. Imagine that – you built your very own hybrid. However, unlike a traditional car, OSVehicle gives you the blueprints and let’s you (or forces you, depending on your perspective) to construct your own body panels. If the project takes flight, we’ll start seeing some pretty unique cars on our roadways. RELATED: See more images and galleries of hybrid vehicles
Got 60 Minutes? You Could Build this Wild OSVehicle
The second vehicle, dubbed the Urban Tabby, is the more relevant choice for car buyers. The Urban Tabby structure mounts atop the same chassis and provides users a road-ready and certified car that will apparently be legal in North America, Europe, and Asia. Current models have a top speed of around 43mph to 55mph (engine displacements range from 50cc all the way up to 250cc), and all totaled are expected to retail for around $5,350 to $8,000. But it’s got us thinking; why not buy the base road-legal kit and then swap in a superbike engine? These rear-engined kit-cars just got a brand new fan base. RELATED: Check out the 2013 Local Motors Rallyfighter

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