2015 Subaru WRX Quick Drive: A Grippy First Impression

We’ve been waiting anxiously to get behind the wheel of the new Subaru WRX. It’s one of those cars that begs to be driven — and hard. Thankfully, our friends at ibeSTAMPED managed to pick one up early from the dealership, and give us a chance to take it for a quick spin. So here’s what we thought of it. Subtle Beauty
2015 Subaru WRX Quick Drive: A Grippy First Impression
Like the WRX sedan which is replaces, the new Subie isn’t a show-stopping, panty-dropping four-door supermodel. It’s subtle, but it’s beautiful. It features sharper new lines, ditching the old WRX’s rounder and softer exterior. And while some say it is strangely reminiscent of the Mitsubishi Evo, it’s easy to see that this is in fact an evolved WRX, not just a rebadged Evo. Inside — like all Subarus — the interior is minimal. A new dash-mounted console proves to be more capable than the one it replaces. The aftermarket Pioneer audio system is long gone, replaced by a simpler layout including navigation and bluetooth. And that’s in the base model. PHOTOS: See More of the 2015 Subaru WRX Stuck Like Glue
2015 Subaru WRX Quick Drive: A Grippy First Impression
With an updated four-wheel drive system, and a smoother six-speed manual gearbox, the Subaru WRX lives up to its performance credentials. While not overpowering, the Subie knows how to get up and go. The new 2.0-liter turbocharged engine delivers 268 horsepower, the six-speed manual is quick, and the overall straight-line performance is smile-enducing. But let’s talk about what really makes the WRX, a WRX. Dat grip. The Symmetrical All-Wheel Drive has been upgraded with a new torque-vectoring system that sticks to pavement like glue. Corners were no match for the sheer stickiness that the WRX employs. Even with traction control off, and in the wet, getting the tires to go free is no easy feat. Our only knock against the WRX would be a wee bit of body roll. PHOTOS: See More of the 2015 Subaru WRX STI Overall
2015 Subaru WRX Quick Drive: A Grippy First Impression
We tested the base WRX, which has a starting price of about $26,295. For that you still get bluetooth and navigation, but you'll have to manage with cloth seats and no keyless start. But that’s beside the point. When it was all said and done, our quick spin of the WRX lefts us remembering why we loved the Subie so much in the first place. It has performance, it has grip, and it plays fair in price compared to the rest of the field, without too much technology. Our only question is — why the hell would you buy an STI? PHOTOS: See More of the 2013 Subaru WRX Concept

Be part of something big