The K-Car: The Right Vehicle for the Right Time

The 1970s and 80s were scary times for the American automotive industry. Competition from overseas, along with a host of labor disputes and quality control issues, were pushing the Big Three further and further behind their Japanese and German counterparts. By 1980 it was clear that Detroit had to figure out how to answer the public’s demand for well-built, fuel-efficient vehicles, if automobiles were to continue to be built in the USA. With the legendary Lee Iacocca at its helm, Chrysler designers and engineers went back to the drawing board. They focused on ways to build autos with four cylinders instead of eight, switch from rear-wheel to front-wheel drive, and replace heavy, bulky metal components with lighter materials. The company had been saved from bankruptcy in 1980 only by a lifeline tossed by a reluctant Uncle Sam, largely because Chrysler built the military’s tanks. Iacocca and co. were anxious to prove that they could turn the fortunes of the ailing giant around.
The K-Car: The Right Vehicle for the Right Time
Their efforts resulted in the K-series of cars, which debuted in 1981. Specific models included the Aries, Reliant, second-generation LeBaron, and the Dodge 400. Distinct features included front and rear bench seats, solid beam rear axles, and independent front suspensions with MacPherson struts. The K-Car achieved fuel economy ratings which were virtually unheard of among American cars at the time, averaging 26 miles per gallon city and 41 highway with the manual transmission. 0-60 acceleration with the automatic gearbox was 13 seconds or so. The K-Car was no muscle car, but it wasn’t meant to be. It was intended to show that Detroit could think on its feet and respond to changing demands. It succeeded. The original K-Car models sold between 280,000 and 360,000 units per year from 1981-88, and enabled Chrysler to pay off it government loans ahead of time. Tough times would eventually return for America’s third largest carmaker, but its K-Cars saw it through the decade of Ronald Reagan, and showed that America could still compete with anyone.

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