Monster on Wheels: How the Nissan GT-R Captured the Title 'Godzilla'

As we usually do, sitting around late at night socializing (stalking) our curious Facebookers, I happened to come across a comment in which we were called out on our use of the word "Godzilla" in reference to the all new 2014 Nissan GT-R; and rightfully so. In reality, the term "Godzilla" was originally coined with the not-for-us-anymore Skyline R32, which ran in production from 1989 until 1994. As always, we have awesome readers/Facebookers. But that got me thinking, what was the origin of the term "Godzilla?" Naturally, we associate the GT-R in reference to a 100-foot-tall, fire-breathing lizard for some pretty obvious stereotypes reasons. It's a monster, it's from Japan, and if we look back in history, the ride height is freakishly more pronounced than previous Japanese cars of past; a menacing 8-inches taller and 850 pounds heavier than the NSX. But we dug a little deeper into what really makes Godzilla, Godzilla. We came across this (pictured below).

Monster on Wheels: How the Nissan GT-R Captured the Title 'Godzilla'

This magazine cover from Australia's 1989 issue of Wheels magazine claims the first coining of the term "Godzilla" in reference to the 1989 Skyline R32. The 2.6L twin-turbo inline-six that powered the 280-hp R32 was- at the time- a new and exciting feat by a Japanese automaker. Combined with a variable torque split, ABS and four wheel steering, it was quite literally the most menacing piece of four-wheeled machinery on the market. Taking a note from Japanese media who given the title "Obakemono," or, a shape-shifting monster, Wheels editor-in-cheif Phil Scott decided that the rather extravagant word needed a bit of simplifying. Thus the term "Godzilla on wheels," stuck, and until today, Nissan's monster of a machine receives the Godzilla moniker from time to time, although, technically incorrect. Source: Wheels

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