How to Fix the Lincoln Motor Company

As Ford is currently doing very well, with such hits as the immortal F-150 and sexy redesigned Fusion, its sister brand, Lincoln Motor Company, has gathered recent attention because, well, it seems to have fallen apart. Arguably struggling since the most recent facelift of the dinosaur Town Car in 2003, Lincoln is currently in the proverbial can. With forgettable offers such as the MKX (its rebadged Ford Edge), the MKS (built on the woeful Taurus platform) and perhaps their biggest recent failure, the MKT (third row seating for dwarves only), Lincoln is in dire need of a heart transplant. In order to breathe life back into what was once a great American car, there may be only one choice: the Continental.

Think about it; when someone says the word “Lincoln”, there’s only one car that instantly pops into your head - that sleek, sexy, suicide-door-rocking beast of a car from the 1960s. In order for this icon to be properly reborn though, there are some boxes that must be ticked. It needs to be uncompromisingly luxurious; the Continental used to be the number one choice for businessmen, mobsters, even the President had a fleet of them. It was the quintessential American car before Cadillac ever was and it needs to at least re-claim that title.

How to Fix the Lincoln Motor Company

It also must be able to run with anything offered from Japan or Germany. Make it on a stretched Fusion platform to save weight, offer the EcoBoost six as the standard engine with the option of a tuned V8 from the Mustang, and harken back to the days when it was first class or no class for styling both inside and out. Take inspiration from the 1962 Conti – it was the rarest and possibly the most beautiful. Rear-hinged doors would be nice, but more important is that on the rear quarter panels just ahead of the tail lights, “Continental” be spelled in chrome. If it’s good enough, it would not only put Lincoln back on the map at home, but it would catapult one of America’s most historically successful auto companies onto the world stage where it once shined, where it truly deserves to be. Build it Lincoln! 

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