The 1967 Plymouth GTX: Raw Power In a Refined Package

The fact that the cell phones are the product everyone seeks to one-up these days says something about the times we live in. In the mid-60s it wasn’t phone or a computer, but muscle cars that spurred intense competition between manufacturers. In those long-gone days of 30-cent gasoline, the king of the mountain was the Pontiac GTO Tempest. It was confronted by a number of challengers seeking to knock the crown off its head. Among them was the legendary 1967 Plymouth GTX, which gained fame thanks to its exceptional styling, which was matched with one of the quickest 0-60 times in automotive history. PHOTOS: See More of the 1967 Plymouth GTX A Street Beast With a Refined Edge
The 1967 Plymouth GTX: Raw Power In a Refined Package
The suits at Plymouth wanted the ’67 GTX to be a marriage of refinement and raw power, a car that would appeal to white collar types with a serious penchant for speed. The company spared no expense in loading it up with plenty of goodies. They included front bucket seats, faux racing stripes, hood scoops, and a flashy front grille. The ‘67 was far more than just a piece of eye candy. It was equipped with a heavy-duty suspension and a TorqueFlite automatic transmission. Buyers had a choice between two of the most obscenely powerful engines ever to roll off an assembly line. One was the 440 cubic inch “Super Commando” power plant. When combined with the GTX’s relatively light weight and 116-inch wheelbase it could run 0-60 in 6.5 seconds and finish the quarter mile in 15.2 seconds at 97 MPH. PHOTOS: See More of the 1967 Plymouth Barracuda
The 1967 Plymouth GTX: Raw Power In a Refined Package
But even this impressive performance paled in comparison to that of the 426 cubic inch HEMI, which could be selected for an additional $564. Fed by a pair of 4-barrel AFB carbs, it hit 60 at 4.5 seconds and knocked out the quarter mile in 13.5 seconds at 105 MPH. Even by today's standards that's quick. So when someone tells you that life was slower in the old days, remind them of the 1967 GTX. PHOTOS: See More of the 1967 Plymouth Belvedere Photo Credit: Teddy Pieper

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