SEMA Bound Custom Chevrolets Do Absolutely Nothing For Me

SEMA is a funny place for a carmaker to attend. Not that its out of place, but the whole point of the aftermarket and tuner show is to display what someone would do to improve upon a stock model. The mere presence of an automaker at this show is somewhat contradictory, but without fail, the automakers show up. With mixed results. That is because SEMA itself is one big cluster-eff that doesn't know quite what it is. We've come a long way since the days of Fast and the Furious, and the terrible, terrible choices that people make in modifying their cars. The aftermarket world has gained a lot of notoriety, and become more refined. This modification craze has even prompted many automakers to offer their own tuner-style cars so the modification dollars say in house. Perhaps unsurprisingly, the OEM-modified cars are actually far more tasteful than that you may see from a tuning house who's shop is a front for a meth lab in Bakersfield, CA. With the resources and might of the big carmaker, whole pieces can be manufactured with a new look, rather than taking on wins and vents to the existing body panels.
SEMA Bound Custom Chevrolets Do Absolutely Nothing For Me
That said, the Chevy SEMA cars do not do much for me. Ford was smart enough to take their best-looking car right now (the Fusion) and modify that in several very attractive ways. GM, on the other hand is bringing several loveless cars and sprucing them up to generate buzz for them. I remember when my uncle gave me his Oldsmobile Acheiva and I told him of the tweaks I was going to make to it, he replied "You know, you can polish it all you want, but a turd is still a turd." The same sentiment can be applied to the Chevy Sonic and lackluster Malibu. SEMA is great when you are enhancing an already-awesome car. Sprucing up some underpowered econobox is the wrong way of going about it.

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