How can a road car produce LMP1-matching downforce?

Last week, Aston Martin unveiled its astonishing AM-RB001. Designed in collaboration by Aston Martin design director Marek Reichmann and Red Bull F1's technical guru Adrian Newey, it is said to corner as fast as an LMP1 race car. That needs a massive amount of downforce but, at a glance, the AM-RB001 doesn't appear to be wearing that many aerodynamic devices.

Look closer, though, and you'll see there is a lot of very clever, very complex airflow management going on. Much more clever and complex than I understand but, luckily, Youtuber Kyle Drives has produced this video explaining what the various F1, LMP1 and Time Attack-inspired devices do.

An even more extreme track car version will follow later. Power will come from a V12 engine of unspecified capacity with some sort of hybridisation, possibly a kinetic energy recovery system (KERS). Aston has confirmed it will have a power-to-weight ratio of one horsepower per kilogramme, with a target weight of 1,000 kg. I'll save you the math: that's 1,000 HP. That LMP1-chasing lap time might not be a pipe dream, after all. As could a Bugatti Chiron-baiting top speed, though according to Newey that's less of a priority. Much like the McLaren F1, the focus here is on driving enjoyment, not chasing records.


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