Volkswagen has released an on-board clip with the Golf GTI Clubsport S to prove it’s the new FWD king at the Nürburgring.

When VW announced plans to introduce a spicy “S” version of the Golf GTI Clubsport, it said the front-wheel-drive hot hatch was being tuned specifically for the ‘Ring. At that point we just assumed the folks from Wolfsburg were gunning for the FWD record and as it turns out that proved to be a valid assumption. With a time of 7 minutes and 49.21 seconds, German racing driver Benny Leuchter took down the Nürburgring record for a front-wheel-drive car with a Golf GTI Clubsport S.

Now we have proof of the achievement courtesy of a clip released by Autocar (but actually shot by Volkswagen) showing the record-breaking attempt. This was partially possible by squeezing 310 horsepower and 280 pound-feet of torque from the turbocharged, 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine. In addition, several weight-saving measures (including the removal of the rear seats) have slashed about 66 pounds (30 kilograms) compared to the Golf GTI Clubsport.

Offered exclusively with a six-speed manual to further cut weight, the two-seater Golf GTI Clubsport S runs to 62 mph (100 kph) in 5.8 seconds and maxes out at 162 mph (260 kph). This makes it the quickest road-going Golf GTI ever, and with 310 hp on tap, it’s also the most powerful.

While in the original press release published last week VW said the target is to make 5,000 units, it turns out only 400 cars will be produced and 100 are reserved for Germany along with another 150 for U.K. All of them will be offered in the colors of the original GTI (“Tornado Red”, “Pure White”, “Deep Black Pearl Effect) with a black roof.

There’s no word on pricing just yet, but obviously it’s going to be more expensive than the non-S version which in its domestic market kicks off at €34,925. It will be interesting to see how much VW will ask for this special edition, limited-run GTI taking into account the all-wheel-drive Golf R begins at €39,500 in Germany.

Source: Volkswagen via

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