Volkswagen has consistently said the company is cooperating with the investigation into the Dieselgate scandal but government officials would beg to differ.

Volkswagen has consistently said the company is cooperating with the investigation into the Dieselgate scandal but government officials would beg to differ.

As Reuters reports, Volkswagen is refusing to provide government investigators with e-mails and other communications between key executives.  The company is citing a German privacy law but that's not sitting well with officials including Connecticut Attorney General George Jepsen who said "I find it frustrating that, despite public statements professing cooperation and an expressed desire to resolve the various investigations that it faces following its calculated deception, Volkswagen is, in fact, resisting cooperation by citing German law."

Jepsen isn't alone as the U.S. Justice Department's civil suit against the automaker noted efforts to learn the truth about the emissions scandal were "impeded and obstructed by material omissions and misleading information provided by VW entities."

As we reported last month, Volkswagen is blaming the scandal a handful of rogue employees and a "mindset in some areas of the company that tolerated breaches of rules."  Volkswagen hasn't named anyone in particular but believes the root cause of the scandal started in 2005 when the company made a "strategic decision to launch a large-scale promotion of diesel vehicles in the United States."  However, Volkswagen says the EA 189 engine could not meet the stricter nitrogen oxide requirements in the United States within the required timeframe and budget.  This problem led employees to develop a defeat device to circumvent emission standards.

Source: Reuters

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