Industry experts are saying Volkswagen’s diesel fix could require two distinct solutions, depending on the car’s pollution control system.

Industry experts are saying Volkswagen's diesel fix could require two distinct solutions, depending on the car’s pollution control system.

Yesterday we heard VW saying a diesel fix is in the works for almost 11 million cars equipped with the Euro 5-compliant EA189 engine and all of them will have to go through a "service procedure." Now we get to find out more about what that actually means and it seems it's more than just a software update as industry experts and U.S. regulators are saying hardware changes will be required as well for some of the engines.

There will be two solutions and choosing between one and the other will be done based on the vehicle's pollution control system. According to EPA, fixing the cars from the 2009-2014 model years will require more time because these have devices known as "lean NOx traps" which were created to reduce nitrogen oxides in engine exhaust. Back in 2012, Volkswagen started offering the same 2.0 TDI engine with a more complex emissions control system known as Selective Catalytic Reduction which injects a liquid urea solution in the exhaust to diminish nitrogen oxides.

The software implemented in these two types of emissions control systems will have to be revised and in some cases a hardware change will also be necessary. According to some analysts, these modifications could have a negative impact on the car's performances and could also increase fuel consumption.

Volkswagen will reveal next month their plan to fix almost 11 million cars not just from the core brand, but also from Audi, Skoda, SEAT and their Commercial Vehicles division.

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