Volkswagen’s ex CEO Martin Winterkorn is now the subject of an investigation for fraud in Germany where the prosecutors are analyzing what really happened with those 11 million diesel cars.

Volkswagen's ex CEO Martin Winterkorn is now the subject of an investigation for fraud in Germany where the prosecutors are analyzing what really happened with those 11 million diesel cars.

 

The Volkswagen Group is going through some difficult times as their situation keeps getting worse day by day, with the latest example coming from Germany where the prosecutors have started an investigation concerning former CEO Martin Winterkorn to find out whether he is in any way responsible for the illegal acts regarding 11 million TDI-powered cars that have a special software created specifically to enable the vehicles pass emissions tests.

 

When he resigned last Wednesday, Winterkorn said he was "not aware of any wrongdoing on my part" while the R&D bosses from VW, Audi and Porsche - which all have been reportedly suspended - have denied their involvement as well in tweaking cars with a "defeat device" to meet emission restrictions.

 

At the moment of writing, we know from VAG those 11 million diesel vehicles include 5M VWs, 2.1M Audis and 1.2M Skodas. SEAT hasn't issued a statement just yet about how many cars they have with the special software made by Bosch. The biggest automotive supplier in the world said the defeat device was made purely for testing purposes, but apparently Volkswagen decided to use it on production cars, despite warnings coming from Bosch in 2007 and even from a VW engineer four years later.

As a reminder, Volkswagen's Supervisory board has appointed 62-year old Matthias Müller as the new CEO of Volkswagen AG to replace Martin Winterkorn. In his first statement, Müller said Volkswagen will eventually "emerge from this crisis stronger than before" and his "most urgent task is to win back trust for the Volkswagen Group."

 

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