Spyker hasn't said much about the B6 Venator lately but the company has just announced plans to fund the model with an "innovative corporate financing initiative."

Spyker hasn't said much about the B6 Venator lately but the company has just announced plans to fund the model with an "innovative corporate financing initiative."

Dubbed the Spyker Venator Bond, the financing initiative turns buyers into investors who are being asked to pony up £100,000 ($167,170 / €121,392) in return for a bond that has a unique B6 Venator chassis number that ensures they will receive a "first-edition car featuring a special exterior / interior color scheme and badging." If investors don't want the car, they can get a four year term that pays them up to £133,547 ($223,250 / €162,116).

100 bonds will be available initially but the company plans to offer a second round of bonds in the future. If everything goes according to plan, Spyker will raise up to £20 ($33.4 / €24.2) million in total.

According to Spyker CEO Victor R. Muller, "I wanted to give like-minded drivers who demand the highest standards a new choice, one that delivers a rare combination of heritage, design, performance and exclusivity. That describes the Spyker B6 Venator perfectly. Now with the Spyker Venator Bond, like-minded investors can take part in a first-of-its-kind financial opportunity designed for them in the uniquely Spyker vein."

While Spyker plays up the innovate nature of the bonds, it raises a lot of interesting questions as to why they would go this route. Did banks refuse to give Spyker money? Will potential buyers lose some protections because investments carry inherent risk? There's no clear answer.

Regardless, Spyker says the B6 Venator will go into production later this year. It will be launched in Europe, India, the Middle East and the Asia Pacific region before going on sale in the United States in 2015.

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