The war of words between Tesla and the New York Times is heating up as CEO Elon Musk has penned a lengthy article which contradicts allegations made by reporter John Broder.

The war of words between Tesla and the New York Times is heating up as CEO Elon Musk has penned a lengthy article which contradicts allegations made by reporter John Broder.

As a primer, Broder was given a Model S to test drive as part of an article which was supposed to be about Tesla's Supercharger network. Unfortunately things didn't go according to plan as Broder contends the car ran out of power during the latter part of his journey. He says this occurred despite the display saying "charge complete" at Supercharger stations and using "Tesla’s range-maximization guidelines" which include slowing down and lowering the cabin temperature.

Shortly after the article was posted, Musk declared it to be a fake and acknowledged that, in the wake of the Top Gear lawsuit, Tesla records data on all cars given to the media.

Fast forward to today and Musk's article points out several inconsistencies with Broder's piece. In an effort to describe how Broder "worked very hard to force our car to stop running," Musk says the data shows that the "Model S' battery never ran out of energy at any time, including when Broder called the flatbed truck." The company also contends the writer stopped charging the vehicle with an estimated range of 32 miles (51 km), despite the fact that the final leg of the journey was 61 miles (98 km).

Musk goes on to say when the vehicle's battery was running low, Broder increased the cabin temperature instead of lowering it to extend his range as stated in the article. The executive also contests allegations that Broder set the cruise control to 54 mph (87 km/h) and had to eventually "limp along at 45 mph (72 km/h)."

More importantly, data shows that Broder never fully recharged the Model S. According to Tesla, Broder recharged the car to 90% at the first stop, 72% at the second stop and 28% at the last stop. As a result, Musk asks "Why would anyone do that?" which implies he believes Broder wanted the car to fail.

To back up his case, Musk says Broder "drove in circles for over half a mile in a tiny, 100-space parking lot" with the estimated range of zero in an effort to get the car to die.

In the end, Musk says he contacted Broder to attempt to clear up any "honest mistakes" in his article. However, the executive contends Broder stuck by his story and simply changed the facts when they "didn't suit his opinion."

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