Chevrolet has announced a series of "enhancements" which aim to prevent the Volt from setting on fire a few days or weeks after a severe crash.

Chevrolet has announced a series of "enhancements" which aim to prevent the Volt from setting on fire a few days or weeks after a severe crash.

As part of a "Customer Satisfaction Program," the company will:

  • Strengthen an existing portion of the Volt's safety structure to enhance battery protection in side-impact crashes
  • Add a sensor in the reservoir of the battery coolant system to monitor coolant levels.
  • Add a tamper-resistant bracket to the top of the battery coolant reservoir to help prevent potential coolant overfill.

Volt owners will be individually notified when the modifications are available for their vehicle and the changes will be incorporated into the Volt manufacturing process.

According to Mary Barra, GM's senior vice president of Global Product Development, "These enhancements and modifications will address the concerns raised by the severe crash tests [conducted by the NHTSA]." She added, "We have tested the Volt's battery system for more than 285,000 hours, or 25 years, of operation. We're as confident as ever that the cell design is among the safest on the market."

As we have previously reported, the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) conducted a side-impact crash test to measure the Volt's occupant protection levels in May. Three weeks later, the vehicle mysterious burst into flames. During additional testing, the agency discovered the Volt's lithium-ion battery could emit sparks and begin smoking after being damaged and rotated 180 degrees.

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