There were a few spots of drizzle in the air at Albert Park on Wednesday morning, but a wet Australian grand prix remains only a remote possibility.

There were a few spots of drizzle in the air at Albert Park on Wednesday morning, but a wet Australian grand prix remains only a remote possibility.

Local reports predict a chance of rain on both Friday and Saturday, and cloudy skies throughout Melbourne's fifteenth formula one race weekend.

But the worst of the weather should hold off until Monday, and after Wednesday's grey morning, the warm sun was shining down on the paddock by afternoon.

Some pundits are actually hoping Melbourne's notoriously fickle weather intervenes this weekend, in the wake of the processional Bahrain race two weeks ago and expectations that more one-stop strategies will be the order of the day at Albert Park.

"If you look at it, you'd say it is going to be the same as Bahrain," said reigning world champion Jenson Button in Melbourne.

Bahrain winner Fernando Alonso was one of the first to predict a boring season after the 2010 season opener, but on Tuesday he admitted that those sorts of comments had been "hot headed".

"It's too early to talk about changing the rules," said the Ferrari driver. "We have to wait and see different races and check the situation, without being emotional.

"Something that confuses the fans is changing the rules all the time," added Alonso.

The media should also be taking blame for the 'Bore-rain' hype, like Britain's Sun newspaper who said the sport now has "two races to save the season".

The newspaper was reporting the latest comments made in Australia by Button, who was denying that a rule change in one area will be enough to solve F1's new problem.

"You can't just think of one area. You need to think about a couple," said the McLaren driver, who in Bahrain struggled to match the pace of his new teammate Lewis Hamilton.

But as an insider in the Spanish media observed: "Losers always want different rules."

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