Sir Frank Williams now believes his Grove based formula one outfit will re-join the manufacturer-dominated teams association FOTA.

The fiercely independent British team was expelled by FOTA's directors earlier this year for breaking ranks amid the political turmoil and signing up for the 2010 world championship.

Williams, who said at the time he did not expect to re-join the Geneva based body, then further risked the ire of its rivals by blocking a test for Ferrari's Michael Schumacher, opposing a push for three-car team entries, and fighting its corner over measures for the 2010 technical and sporting rules.

But after the similarly expelled Force India indicated it intends to re-join FOTA, Sir Frank Williams has said in an interview with the Telegraph newspaper that he expects to also renew his team's membership "sooner rather than later".

The 67-year-old is however unapologetic about Williams' recent stances that have not made the team the most popular among rivals.

"Those are the rules and the rules are put together with more force and authority by the manufacturers than by teams like Williams," he explained.

"We've signed up to those rules and we expect all parties who are signed up to honour their signatures."

Williams said recently he would "block" Ferrari's push, backed reportedly by McLaren and Renault, to enter a third car in 2010, and now the Briton is prepared to explain his reasoning.

"If you have two or three elite teams with great resources and almost unbeatable cars, they will occupy the first four and a half rows on the grid (if they have 3 cars each).

"If you're team number five in the pecking order you have no chance of getting near the front of a grid. It's not healthy," he said.

In the recent midst of the breakaway threats and reports of doom and gloom, Williams remained confident throughout that F1 would emerge with its strength.

His view remains the same now: "F1 has always enjoyed turbulent times. It's never particularly stable. But I have every confidence that it will be a highly regarded and well-followed sport 10 or 20 years from now."


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