How to offer a robust and comfortable means of transportation at low costs? Try merging a car and a motorcycle. This is what the Brazilian three-wheeler Pompéo will do this year.

Some vehicles may choose to use motorcycle engines and concepts in order to have better performances, such as the Cirbin V13R, but there are others that have different objectives, such as the safety and comfort of a car with the running costs of a two-wheeler. One of these will be released this year, in Brazil, and it will be called Pompéo.

This 2.33 m long and 1.30 m vehicle, a three-wheeler with a 250 cm³ motorcycle engine that runs on gasoline or ethanol, will be presented to the public later this year and intends to offer solutions in many fields.

First of all, it is considered to be a more rational means of transportation because it is small and would surely minimise traffic problems in huge Latin American cities, such as the City of Mexico and Sao Paulo. This last one faces more than 180 km of traffic jams every day.

Secondly, since it also runs on ethanol, and its engine is small enough to generate very low emissions, it can be considered an environment-friendly vehicle. Although its engine is not very powerful, the manufacturer ensures the vehicle will be very light (not more than 500 kg), what will prevent this little people mover from being a traffic stopper.

Last, but not least, it will be a closed vehicle, with doors and seat belts, what, in most countries, will allow it to be driven without a helmet. Compared to motorcycles, especially in rainy days, Pompéo will offer much more comfort in everyday use. Also according to the manufacturer, it will not cost much more than a 400 cm³ motorbike, what will make it a real option for people that would like to buy a car, but can only afford a motorcycle.

Initial production will be directed to the Brazilian market, but there are plans for export, mainly in Latin American countries. Let’s wait for the revelation of the vehicle in order to bring you more info on this machine.

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