The steady stream of crisis meetings continued on Sunday, mere hours before the prestigious Monaco grand prix.

The steady stream of crisis meetings continued on Sunday, mere hours before the prestigious Monaco grand prix.

After similar meetings this week on Flavio Briatore's yacht, at the Automobile Club de Monaco and in the Toyota motor home, on Sunday it was the turn of the Renault motor home to host the ten formula one teams.

The French squad took the precaution of papering over the windows of the structure, for fear of reporters and photographers capturing the expected histrionics within.

This time, the latest fire to extinguish is independent team Williams' apparent intention to meet the FIA's May 29 deadline for 2010 entries.

If the Grove squad breaks ranks with the works-backed rebels, who are threatening to quit the sport over the dispute with Max Mosley, it is likely to spur fellow privateers Brawn and Force India to follow suit.

"Williams exist to build formula one cars and believe they cannot permit politics to interfere with their business operation," a report in Sunday's Daily Mail said.

Some figures involved have in Monaco been signalling "constructive" talks and a looming end to the crisis, but respected commentator Martin Brundle explained the conundrum that will not reach an easy conclusion.

"It is right to fight for the new teams and to save the competitive souls already in the pitlane from their own excesses. Honda exited stage left. Renault or Toyota could go at the drop of a hat," the former driver wrote in his column for the Sunday Times.

Former quadruple world champion Alain Prost, also at Monaco, can also not predict the outcome, despite his vast experience as a driver and team owner.

"I have thought about it a lot, but I do not have the solution: I can understand both the FIA and the FOTA viewpoints very well," the Frenchman told Germany's SID news agency.

 

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