With the start of F1's European season now looming, two teams not yet running KERS systems have revealed they have no immediate plans to implement the new technology.

With the start of F1's European season now looming, two teams not yet running KERS systems have revealed they have no immediate plans to implement the new technology.

Toyota, who locked out of the front row of the Bahrain grid last weekend, announced last year that they would begin the 2009 season without KERS, which converts otherwise lost braking energy into additional power bursts.

"So far at the moment we are not planning to use KERS," German driver Timo Glock said in Bahrain.

The same is true of Red Bull, who as Renault's engine customer would use the energy recovery technology developed by the French squad.

But team boss Christian Horner said: "In terms of ultimate performance we don't feel it has earned its place on our car yet but that's not to say it will not do in the future.

"We retain a very open mind about KERS but at the moment there is no fixed date at which to introduce it," he added.

Similarly, Toro Rosso, Force India and Brawn would use the active systems of their engine suppliers Ferrari and Mercedes respectively, but are currently holding off.

Williams is working hard on its unique flywheel system and intends to race it as soon as possible.

But two teams already using battery-based KERS systems are having second thoughts. Renault's Flavio Briatore in Bahrain said the team will "maybe use it for another one or two races, if everything goes well".

Ferrari, meanwhile, were analysing the KERS benefit in detail last weekend, running it in practice on Felipe Massa's car but not Kimi Raikkonen's.

Said boss Stefano Domenicali: "Our project was born around KERS and it is very difficult to change the complete car, thinking that KERS is not there, so we need to find the best compromise."

 

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