F1 team figures will meet after the forthcoming China-Bahrain double header to assess the damage to the previously united FOTA alliance.

F1 team figures will meet after the forthcoming China-Bahrain double header to assess the damage to the previously united FOTA alliance.

In the Shanghai paddock on Thursday, Ferrari's Stefano Domenicali and BMW's Mario Theissen had to admit that the diffuser affair has tested the harmony of the body.

"It is clear that tensions are now quite high," said Domenicali, a day after the FIA's Court of Appeal deemed the diffusers of the Brawn, Toyota and Williams teams legal.

Ferrari, along with Renault, Red Bull and BMW - and quietly backed by McLaren - had challenged the legality of the rear aerodynamic devices, and the arguments in the Paris hearing at some times veered into the personal.

"It could have repercussions and cause a rift among FOTA member teams," Domenicali acknowledged. "This is not a good situation as FOTA is very important for the future of formula one."

Theissen also admitted the saga is "definitely a test to FOTA".

"It doesn't make it easier, definitely," he said of the challenge of keeping F1 teams united.

Domenicali would not be drawn on whether he believes the affair would have been enjoyed by Max Mosley and Bernie Ecclestone, who undoubtedly fear a united FOTA more than a fractious group of arguing teams.

"I don't want to say that," the Italian said.

 

 

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