Timo Glock has admitted to having an "uneasy feeling" as the FIA prepares on Tuesday to settle the diffuser controversy.

Timo Glock has admitted to having an "uneasy feeling" as the FIA prepares on Tuesday to settle the diffuser controversy.

The German and his Toyota teammate Jarno Trulli, along with the Brawn and Williams drivers, have among the fastest cars on the 2009 grid.

But their pace has been questioned by the affair, with four teams pursuing formal protests about rear diffuser designs, and every outfit except Toro Rosso and Force India to be involved in the Court of Appeal hearing in Paris.

It is almost guaranteed that the FIA panel will not rule against the stewards of the Australian and Malaysian grands prix, and the pre-season ruling made by Charlie Whiting, when the decision is published on Wednesday.

Ross Brawn said: "Even if they decide there is a different interpretation, I don't think they'll wipe out what went before (the race results) because we've been told our car is legal."

Team boss Brawn's long-time friend and former colleague Rory Byrne, however, staunchly disagrees that the diffusers are legal.

"If you look at the Brawn-Mercedes from below, you can see the suspension -- and that is forbidden," the Ferrari design consultant is quoted as saying by Italy's La Gazzetta dello Sport.

Germany's Auto Motor und Sport reports that, because of the layout of the Ferrari rear suspension and gearbox, technical director Aldo Costa is believed to be targeting only June's Turkish grand prix for the debut of a double-diffuser for the F60.

Red Bull is apparently in a similar situation, while McLaren, BMW and Renault may be able to debut new diffusers at the start of the forthcoming European season.

 

Be part of something big