The same 3 trim levels from the 5-door are on offer here too - Classic, Comfort and Style. Notable technology is the 1.2 liter Kappa gasoline engine, with 78 hp and a very economical fuel consumption of just 5.2 liters per 100 km.

5-door or 3-door hatch? Which do you prefer stylistically? In North America, 5-door hatches are avoided as if they somehow all magically appear to potential customers as a 1984 Dodge Omni. In Europe, most buyers opt for a 5-door hatch, including on sports models such as the Golf GTI.

But Hyundai isn't taking any chances and has unveiled the 3-door version of the i20 at the Geneva motor show.

Hyundai says the i20 3-door is "targeted at young professionals without children." Which means only people with kids buy the 5-door? Perhaps they need to revise their market research. In any case, nearly all hatches are offered in both configurations so here comes Hyundai trying to keep the i20 fresh and competitive.

The same 3 trim levels from the 5-door are on offer here too - Classic, Comfort and Style. Notable technology is the 1.2 liter Kappa gasoline engine, with 78 hp, a very economical fuel consumption of just 5.2 liters per 100 km and an eviro-reg friendly CO2 emissions rating of 124 g/km.

But demonstrating how some automakers (ahem...Korean and certain Japanese makes) lag behind on emissions/efficiency/engine-management technology, Hyundai is actually boasting that the series of engines on offer in the i20 are Euro IV compliant, when most European automakers' engine lineups are already predominantly meeting Euro V standards.

But the i20 is one of those models that show how much effort both Hyundai and sister brand Kia are putting into their designs and making them the equal of their European counterparts. The i20 aims to be taken seriously. It's still a value proposition which sells a Hyundai but things may be changing.

 

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