F1's driver representative body has hit back at Max Mosley in their dispute over expensive Superlicences.

F1's driver representative body has hit back at Max Mosley in their dispute over expensive Superlicences.

Every driver must obtain a Superlicense from the sport's governing FIA, but last year the price was spiked by between 200 and 350 per cent.

A further increase in line with inflation has enraged the Grand Prix Drivers' Association, moving the GPDA to ask the 2009 field to hold off paying the fees.

FIA president Max Mosley this week dismissed their position as "silly" and "nonsense", arguing that it is the high-earning drivers benefitting from safety advances while living in tax havens.

In a statement of response issued late Friday, the GPDA - claiming their license is the most expensive in the world of sport - said the recent price-hikes are "inherently unfair" and "unreasonable".

The body also responded to Mosley's position that he will only consider the issue if the drivers reveal precise details about their earnings.

"A letter was sent by the GPDA in December declining the request because it was not relevant to ascertaining the appropriate Super Licence fees," the statement said.

"Furthermore, drivers' gross (and net) earnings are confidential to the drivers, their management and financial advisors and any relevant tax authorities, and should be respected as such."

The GPDA said increases to their fees should cover only "administrative" costs rather than be "a revenue stream" for the Paris based federation.

"The FIA should raise sufficient funds from the exploitation of its commercial rights," the drivers continued.

"As a principle, the drivers should not be taxed to fund the costs of others fulfilling their legal duty to the drivers," they said.

 

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