The Williams racer suggests that, combined with the addition of heavy KERS systems in 2009, the tendency is to unfairly penalise the heavier or taller drivers.

Nico Rosberg has hit out at F1's current minimum weight rule.

The Williams racer suggests that, combined with the addition of heavy KERS systems in 2009, the tendency is to unfairly penalise the heavier or taller drivers.

The minimum weight in F1 is 605kg including car and driver.

But with KERS systems weighing between 25 and 40kg, heavy drivers now have even less scope to distribute ballast around the car, to achieve an ideal weight distribution.

So far, it has emerged that, in preparation for 2009, Rubens Barrichello, Kimi Raikkonen and Fernando Alonso have deliberately lost weight.

"I have lost weight and even at Christmas was counting calories," Nico Rosberg now reveals.

"I think the weight rule is unfair because bigger drivers are disadvantaged even before they start (the season)," the 23-year-old German told Speedweek magazine.

"I think it should be urgently talked about in the (drivers' association) GPDA," he said.

Rosberg argues that a variable weight limit, based on the weight of individual drivers, should be installed so that the heavier drivers are not disadvantaged.

BMW's Robert Kubica, standing at about 6 feet or 185cm, shed several kilograms before last season and now weighs sub-70kg, but vows to lose no more for fear of losing strength or fitness, the Cologne newspaper Express said.

Rosberg is 178cm and weighs about 70kg. The diminutive Nick Heidfeld and Felipe Massa are both believed to weigh less than 60kg.

 

Be part of something big