Ron Dennis has ruled himself out of contention as a possible successor to FIA president Max Mosley.

Ron Dennis has ruled himself out of contention as a possible successor to FIA president Max Mosley.

The 61-year-old has decided to step down as McLaren team principal in March, sparking suggestions the timing might be related to the looming end of Mosley's controversial fourth term in office.

Ferrari's former boss Jean Todt has also been linked strongly with the role, but Dennis insists that senior members of successful teams should not be considered.

"Anybody who's in a position of leadership of a company has to live, sleep and breathe that brand, and I think it would be impossible for me - even though I consider myself extremely disciplined - to be completely impartial regarding all the teams," he told the British magazine F1 Racing.

"I don't think it's possible for anyone who's led a successful team, frankly, and it would therefore be inappropriate for me."

Former triple world champion Sir Jackie Stewart holds a similar view, arguing that the FIA should headhunt a "captain of industry" from the corporate world outside of formula one for Mosley's job.

But rumours that disgraced former Royal Bank of Scotland head Sir Fred Goodwin, who has been blamed for the spectacular collapse in the bank's share price, is being lined up for the role have been met with anger.

UK Shareholders Association spokesman Roger Lawson said the appointment would be his "reward of failure", but QC Ian Hamilton told the Scotsman newspaper: "Some day, somewhere, he will be held to account for what he has done, but that doesn't mean he can't work until then."

 

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