Max Mosley has revealed that he is not personally in favour of F1's impending ban on in-race refuelling in 2010.

Max Mosley has revealed that he is not personally in favour of F1's impending ban on in-race refuelling in 2010.

Although part of the recent suite of cost-cutting reforms agreed between the FIA and the F1 teams' alliance FOTA, it is believed that the ban is essentially designed to compel drivers to do their overtaking on the track rather than through varying fuel strategies.

It is also hoped banning refuelling will make race strategies easier to understand, as well as lessen the danger of tyre pit stops.

"I was not in favour of the ban, because I think it is a good part of the show," Mosley, president of F1's governing body, told Italy's La Gazzetta dello Sport.

He said he was relieved that drivers will at least continue to stop to change their tyres, making pit stops in the future more of a straight race between the teams' pit crews.

"At least we have prevented a situation as in the 80s, when at the start of the race the drivers did not fight at all because they were saving their tyres and brakes," Mosley said.

The 68-year-old Briton said he also supports the move to conduct market research into whether the points system should be replaced by Bernie Ecclestone's 'medals' proposal.

Mosley admitted: "The extension of points down to eighth and the reduction in the difference between first and second was an error.

"But I am opposed to frequently changing the points system, because it only confuses people."

 

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