For next year, the engine rev limit will drop to 18,000 rpm, and engine life will double by the imposition of a cap of the use of 20 engines per team per season.

As expected in Monaco on Friday, the FIA's World Motor Sport Council rubber-stamped a raft of cost-saving measures for formula one.

For next year, the engine rev limit will drop to 18,000 rpm, and engine life will double by the imposition of a cap of the use of 20 engines per team per season.

However, contrary to reports, the new one engine per three races rule will remain in place, despite suggestions it might be expanded to four races.

The cost of customer engines to independent teams, however, will be slashed in half, and all in-season testing, as well as the use of full-scale wind tunnels, has been banned.

Moreover, factories must close for six weeks per year. "It is expected that these changes for 2009 will save the manufacturer teams approximately 30 per cent of their budgets compared to 2008, while the savings for independent teams will be even greater," the FIA said.

In 2010, customer engines will cost independent teams less than 5m euros per season, in a measure that spells an end to Max Mosley's proposal for standard engines, as well as the F1 team alliance FOTA's earlier proposal for a new low-cost engine formula for 2011.

Meanwhile, all teams will use the same transmission in 2011 "subject to confirmation of practicability", and the development of some chassis components will be homologated for an entire season.

The FIA said FOTA is "considering proposals for a standard KERS system" for 2010.

Radio and telemetry systems will be standardised, tyre warmers banned, and - significantly - in-race refuelling not allowed.

Market research will be carried out for the possible reduction of race distances, and the same is true for Bernie Ecclestone's 'medals' proposal, as well as possible changes to the qualifying format.

"These proposed changes have the unanimous agreement of the formula one teams, who have played a major role in their development," the FIA acknowledged.

Also at the meeting, Renault was given the green light to make several improvements to its engine for 2009.

 

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