The one-two in-class and 11th overall in the 24-hour race underlines the sporting dynamic and reliability of the new Volkswagen coupe.

Since the 1995 VW Corrado, the sports coupe slot within the VW range has been empty. Thus, the revival of the Scirocco and it's public perception as a sprightly and nimble vehicle like its predecessor carries huge importance for VW and ultimately the success of the model depends on it. VW has set out to establish a motorsports pedigree for the all new “affordable” coupe and what better way to do this than enter a sinister race prepped version into one of the toughest endurances races in the world, the Nürburgring 24 Hours.

Although greatly reducing the risk of failure by enlisting the help of Nürburgring legend Hans Joachim Stuck and double World Rally Champion Carlos Sainz to pilot the two of the three Scirocco GT24s, such talent alone does not guarantee victory. Nonetheless, the two Scirocco GT24s stormed to a class 1-2 and an 11th and 15th place overall finish while the third Scirocco GT24 piloted by Volkswagen board member Dr Ulrich Hackenberg, finished fifth in class and 32nd overall. “It is a great result for the new Scirocco,” said Dr Hackenberg. “The one-two in-class and 11th overall in the 24-hour race underlines the sporting dynamic and reliability of the new Volkswagen coupe.” Kris Nissen, Volkswagen Motorsport Director, added: ‘The racing Scirocco was developed, built and tested in only 75 days. To complete the distance on one of the world’s most demanding tracks first time out, and without serious problem, speaks volumes for the excellent performance of the entire team.’

Like Aston Martin's CEO, Dr Ulrich Bez, it's great to see auto maker board members putting their money where their mouth is, as few can actually make the claim of climbing into one of their company's cars and racing it at a competitive level.

The Scirocco GT24, which is not due to start its production life until the autumn, is powered by a 2-litre TFSI petrol engine developing 325 PS with a DSG transmission.

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