After 2 successful victories in the 24 Hours of Le Mans, the Audi R10 TDI will surely be among the favorites to take the title once again, but Audi are hardly a company who would rest on their laurels.

After 2 successful victories in the 24 Hours of Le Mans, the Audi R10 TDI will surely be among the favorites to take the title once again, but Audi are hardly a company who would rest on their laurels. This year prototypes entered will be powered by the next generation of Biofuel, which has been manufactured from Biowaste, and we are told emissions have been reduced by almost 90% compared with traditional diesel.

Over the past two years, the victorious 650+ horspower R10 TDI has used Shell V-Power diesel which is created from Natural Gas in a process called Gas To Liquids (GTL). Providing the base for the next generation biofuel, a small amount of the old GTL biofuel is mixed with the new generation biofuel, called BTL (Biomass To Liquids).  Both GTL and BTL synthetic fuels are practically Sulphur free and odourless.  BTL is created by extracting Biowaste that is unfit for food use such as waste wood.  

Biofuel has proved to be a highly efficient and powerful alternative.  Its use in a top performing racecar reinforces the high performance potential.  In fact, such application brings us back to the Geneva Motor Show this year when we were presented with the 1018bhp limited edition biofuel Koenigsegg CCXR.

Michael Dick, Member of the Board of Management of AUDI AG explains "Audi voiced its support early for the use of next generation Biofuels at Le Mans. It underlines our philosophy that we view Le Mans as a tough test field for new technologies which will be available at a later date in production cars for our customers. The Automobile Club de l’Ouest (ACO) provides the opportunity to use alternative drive concepts and fuels, which we exploit to the full."

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