Crossovers can be boring, but they sell great, which is exactly what VW needs in the U.S.

The Volkswagen brand might use a flurry of new models as a means to dig its way out of the diesel emissions scandal in the United States. Many of these additions to the lineup would likely be crossovers because the segment continues to grow in the U.S. Division boss Herbert Diess tells Automotive News a final decision on the strategy would come early next year.

“We think we need more product cadence still to really conquer the Americas and I hope after agreeing on the base business plan we can decide on more products,” Diess said, according to Automotive News.

By the end the end of next year, VW will already have more products in the U.S for appealing to crossover buyers. The long-awaited production version of the CrossBlue concept could be a huge hit for the brand. The three-row CUV features chiseled styling and uses the MQB platform. VW invested $900 million into a factory expansion in Chattanooga, Tennessee, to build the model in the U.S.

A long-wheelbase version of the Tiguan (pictured above) is due for next year, too. Spy shots already show the seven-seat model completely undisguised, and it’s quite a handsome crossover. Despite the larger size, we expect VW to offer the same 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder powertrain as the standard length of the CUV.

The Golf Alltrack is also a new part of VW’s U.S model range. It’s more of a high-riding station wagon than a traditional CUV, but customers might like being able to get something different. The Subaru Outback fills a similar niche, and that model is the brand’s second-best seller in America.

VW needs to get out of Dieselgate’s shadow as soon as possible because sales in the U.S are slipping. The company’s volume dipped 4.78 percent in 2015, and 2016 has been even worse.  Through September, the brand’s deliveries have fallen 12.47 percent from last year.

Source: Automotive News

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